Many IDTELi clients have recognized e-learning is indeed a convenient and cost effective way to provide workforce education. In addition to new identity theft state and federal laws, our clients admitted they were in need of filling other education and training gaps within their companies.

Listening the the needs of our clients, IDTELi went out into the marketplace to seek a company that could provide an additional library of Compliance & Ethics courses with sound content. Our library provides ‘mix and match’ flexibility when ordering course lessons from the library to meet your company needs.

The library of Ethics & Compliance Courses are cost effective and engaging. Each SCORM compliant lesson is approximately (1) hour in length. These eLearning courses are non intrusive and self-paced. This makes it convenient to fit our education into varying work schedules. Employees can complete the Lessons and Testing at convenient intervals during the day and week. Information disseminated through our eLearning platform is delivered in a manner conducive for maximum retention. 

Lessons can be read and testing can be completed within the designated timeframe you determine so employee productivity is only minimally impacted.

Call or e-mail us sales@idteli.com for                                  limited time special pricing packages!

IDTELi expands to provide clients with online Ethics & Compliance courses...

 

Business Policies

General Business

Privacy/Security

Employment

International

Miscellaneous

Library of Courses:                  

Stacked Books

Alternative Dispute ResolutionINFO-AlternativeDispute

With the increase in litigation — especially employment litigation — in the 1990s, the time from inception of a lawsuit to decision continued to grow, as did the costs (both actual and "lost opportunity" costs), giving new meaning to the phrase, "Justice delayed is justice denied." Companies began to re-examine their objectives and view their desired outcomes not so much from a legal standpoint, but more from a business perspective. ADR, with its efficiency, speed and cost-effectiveness, became a far more attractive alternative to traditional litigation.

Equally important, ADR gives parties the unique ability to fashion the process, preferably through mutual agreement, according to their specific needs. They can use ADR either as a true alternative to, or in conjunction with, the traditional litigation process with a single objective in mind: to obtain a mutually satisfactory result, as quickly and cost-effectively as possible.

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Americans with Disabilities Act

INFO-AmericansWithDisOn July 26, 1990, the President of the United States signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Known as the ADA, this broad federal statute seeks to end discrimination against individuals with disabilities. Title I of the ADA prohibits employers from discriminating in all aspects of the employment relationship, including application, testing, medical examinations, hiring, training, assignments, evaluations, disciplinary actions, promotions, layoffs and terminations, as well as compensation, leave and other benefits. Since the law went into effect, its enforcement by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has resulted in payments of over $300 million by businesses to more than 20,000 individuals. Recent cases resulting in jury awards of up to $13 million in punitive damages make the importance of understanding and complying the ADA clear.

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Antitrust Basics

INFO-Antitrust

As the complexities of the business world multiply, so do potential antitrust problems for a company up and down its organizational chain. An intricate web of federal, state and international statutes and regulations poses significant dangers for both intentional and inadvertent antitrust violations — companies get fined and broken up, mergers and acquisitions are thwarted, enormous litigation costs pile up, people go to jail. As importantly, businesses and their employees become afraid to be inventive, aggressive and competitive in completely legitimate ways.

Accordingly, it is crucial that businesses train their employees on the what, why and how of antitrust enforcement: (1) what are the basic principles of antitrust law, what problems occur in the real world during formal and informal communication with colleagues, customers, competitors, suppliers and business partners, what special issues arise with e-mail, voice-mail, trade associations and Web sites, what rights of yours are being trampled on by your competitors; (2) why compliance with antitrust law is important to your business goals and the free-enterprise system in general, why avoiding violations and civil and criminal penalties is so important; and (3) how to recognize potential problems, how to deal with them, and how to compete creatively and legitimately.

Course Summary

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Avoiding Insider Trading

INFO-AvoidingInsiderTrading

Buying and selling stocks is no longer the sole domain of wealthy investors and large institutions. In fact, investing in securities has become an important factor in the financial lives of millions of people across many income levels. Frequent news reports of overnight billionaires in the stock market can tempt people to try to cash in on inside information they learn at work before the news is known to the general public. But buying or selling stock based on a simple "tip" or tidbit of information can, under certain circumstances, violate federal law  and lead to severe fines and even prison sentences.

As a result, it is essential that businesses provide their employees with a basic understanding of the laws against insider trading and what they need to do-and not do -- to abide by them. Using easy to understand examples, this Course provides an overview of the law, shows how it applies in the workplace, and explains the civil and criminal penalties that can result if an employee violates the law.

Course Summary
 

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Business Ethics

INFO-Business EthicsIt is widely agreed that every company needs to have a policy statement on legal and ethical conduct. The Organizational Sentencing Guidelines require that a company "must have taken steps to communicate effectively its standards and procedures to all employees and other agents, e.g., by requiring participation in training Courses or by disseminating publications that explain in a practical manner what is required." Thus, if a company hopes to qualify for more lenient treatment under the Guidelines in the event of employee or corporate misconduct, having, disseminating and enforcing a Code of Conduct is essential.

Course Summary

The topics covered in the Course include —

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Conflicts of Interest

 INFO-ConflictsInterest

Almost every week there's a front-page story about a company or a company's employee, or an elected or non-elected official, engaging in an activity that presents a conflict of interest. Without a doubt, the surge in conglomerates and joint ventures has increased the potential for conflicts of interest to arise.

Conflicts of interest can create a lot of bad publicity, damage a company's reputation and goodwill, and interfere with the company's performance. More and more companies are dealing with this problem by establishing a Code of Conduct or standards of business conduct. The first step in this process is to assemble a conflicts-of-interest policy and communicate it to all those who perform any work for the company. Another essential step is to have all employees fill out a conflicts-of-interest questionnaire.

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Contract Law Basics

INFO-ContractLaw

Business people deal with contracts in many different contexts — purchasing, sales, marketing, distribution, employment and others — almost every day. A contract serves, in effect, as the "private law" of the parties on whatever subjects it covers. This is a powerful tool, since the law gives parties tremendous flexibility in defining their contractual relationships. Whatever terms the parties agree to include (within broad legal limits) define their respective rights and obligations for the duration of the contract.

Because every valid contract gives rise to legal rights and obligations, it is important to understand how contracts are (and are not) formed and enforced. Dire consequences may await those who fail to form a valid contract when intended, or who bind themselves or their company to a contract inadvertently.

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Copyright Basics

INFO-CopyrightBasicsCopyright law affects the workplace activities of many employees on a daily basis. Copyright protection extends to newspaper and magazine articles, instructional videos, web sites, computer Courses, and even elevator music. Most people recognize the presence of a copyright by the symbol ©, but even in the absence of the symbol the material may be protected by copyright law.

Employees need to understand copyright basics for at least two reasons. First, to the extent a company produces copyrightable material, the employees must help the company protect its rights in all dealings with others. In addition, as occasional users of copyrighted material, employees need to understand that the unauthorized use of copyrighted material can expose them individually and/or the company to civil liability and even criminal penalties.

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Corporate Compliance Primer INFO-Corporate Compliance

 

The Organizational Sentencing Guidelines have had an undeniably huge impact on the way U.S. companies do business and train their employees to abide by the law. What were considered large fines for corporate misconduct in the pre-Guidelines 1970s — several hundred thousand dollars — are now being dwarfed by fines in the hundreds of millions. In addition to these increasing monetary penalties, there are potential criminal sanctions and civil liability that make corporate compliance one of the most important issues facing companies today.

Of course, a full understanding of corporate compliance does not end with an analysis of the Guidelines. You will also need to take into account (1) other regulatory standards affecting your company's business, (2) the impact of civil lawsuits that can proceed in parallel with criminal actions covered by the Guidelines,(3) the applicability of state law, (4) the potential liability of corporate directors for the company's compliance efforts, and (5) standard compliance practices within your company's industry.

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Corporate Political Activity

INFO-Corporate Political

 

Political activity is heavily regulated by government. Federal and state laws govern everything from campaign finances to communication with legislators, and both corporations and individuals are subject to various campaign-related restrictions. Having a basic understanding of these regulations and restrictions is especially important as we approach this year's presidential, congressional and local elections.

After a brief summary of the sources of the applicable law, this Course discusses what activities are allowed and prohibited by both companies and employees.

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E-Mail and Internet Use

INFO-Email 

With all of the potentially positive uses of e-mail and the Internet come potential abuses as well. Of 1,200 companies surveyed recently about Internet usage, 54% reported that they had caught employees browsing Web sites that were unrelated to their work — some up to eight hours per day! Not only can unauthorized Internet usage take a huge toll on employee productivity, but it can divert network resources from "mission critical" company functions. Improper or indiscriminate use of e-mail can also lead to employee and company liability for workplace discrimination (including sexual harassment), copyright infringement, securities-law violations, antitrust violations, the loss of company trade secrets, and other legal and practical problems.

More and more companies are cracking down on excessive and improper use of e-mail and Internet access by their employees. (According to one recent study, 27% of large U.S. firms checked employee e-mail in 1999, up from 15% in 1997.) The first step in this process is to assemble an "acceptable use policy" and communicate it to all employees — both temporary and permanent, as well as independent contractors — who use or have access to the company's electronic-communication systems. Another essential step is to obtain the employees' assent to the policy, whether by having them sign and return a written acknowledgment or by asking them to submit a computer-based acknowledgment by "clicking" a designated form button.

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Ethics and Compliance Basics

INFO-Ethics & ComplianceReinforcing ethical principles and educating company members about compliance with the law is an ongoing and important responsibility. A company is only as ethical and compliant as its directors, managers and employees. Training is necessary to encourage good behavior, set expectations, demonstrate the company's commitment and inform members of laws that are not common knowledge.

Integrity and scruples not only keep us out of court and out of prison, but they are good for business. One study found that companies making "an explicit commitment to doing business ethically" have produced profit/turnover ratios at 18% higher than those without a similar commitment. Conversely, a bad reputation can ruin a business.

Course Summary

This Course is intended to demonstrate a company's commitment to ethics and set expectations high for its employees, officers and directors. It's also designed to inform company members of basic legal compliance in areas of law that apply to the corporate world.

The topics covered in the Course include —

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EU Competition Law

INFO-EU

As the complexities of the business world multiply and commerce becomes increasingly global, the need to understand issues of antitrust law — commonly referred to as "competition law" in the European Union — becomes more important. A web of international rules poses significant dangers for both intentional and inadvertent competition-law violations. As importantly, businesses and their employees become afraid to be inventive, aggressive and competitive in completely legitimate ways.

Accordingly, it is crucial that companies doing business with European countries train their employees on the what, why and how of EC competition law: (1) what are the basic principles of competition law, what problems occur in the real world during formal and informal communication with colleagues, customers, competitors, suppliers and business partners, what special issues arise with e-mail, voice-mail, trade associations and Web sites, what rights of yours are being trampled on by your competitors; (2) why compliance with competition law is important to your business goals and the free-enterprise system in general, why avoiding violations and civil and criminal penalties is so important; and (3) how to recognize potential problems, how to deal with them, and how to compete creatively and legitimately.

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Export Controls Basics

Exporting - that is, the shipment or transmission of items or material outside of the U.S. - is heavily regulated by federal laws and regulations referred to collectively as "export controls." These controls affect the export of commodities (goods and materials), technology (technical data and know-how) and software from the U.S. to a foreign country. They also affect the re-export of any such U.S. items from one foreign country to another, as well as products made outside the U.S. by or for a U.S. company.

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Fair Labor Standards ActINFO-FairLabor

Consider this: In a recent decision, a federal appellate court upheld a $24,000 judgment against a property-management company for failing to pay an employee overtime under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Imagine a company that fails to pay more than one employee overtime as required by law. A major bank recently agreed to pay employees $3.8 million that it owed in unpaid overtime in a settlement with the Department of Labor. The FLSA is arguably the labor law most often violated by employers.

Violations of the FLSA are likely to become even more prevalent as Congress and the courts broaden the scope of the law to apply to more types of workers. As the make-up of a company's workforce becomes more varied, it is more crucial than ever to be aware of the provisions of the FLSA.

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Family and Medical Leave Act

INFO-FamilyMedical 

 

The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was passed in 1993 to address what workers perceived as the untenable choice between caring for their families or keeping their jobs. The FMLA guarantees employees of companies with more than 50 employees up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave annually for certain medical reasons or for the birth or adoption of a child. Generally, employers must maintain insurance coverage for employees who are on FMLA leave and must reinstate them to the same or equivalent job positions when their leave concludes.

Familiarity with the FMLA is important for two reasons. First, knowing the eligibility requirements and reinstatement policies will help your company minimize the disruption caused by employees who must be absent from work for family or medical reasons. Second, failing to abide by the provisions of the FMLA can expose a company to significant legal liability. For example, in 1998 a gas-station owner had to pay $43,000 for failing to reinstate a manager when he returned from leave for heart surgery. That same year, Wal-Mart had to pay an employee over $19,000 because it violated the FMLA.

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Federal Contracting (OFCCP) Primer

INFO-Federal ContractingFederal regulations require companies that contract with the federal government to take "affirmative action" to ensure that job applicants and employees are treated without discrimination based on their race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability or because they are a veteran. The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Courses (OFCCP) oversees the federal-contracting process, offering technical assistance, conducting compliance evaluations and investigating complaints regarding federal contracting or subcontracting.

When an OFFCP compliance evaluation discloses material violations or results in discrimination findings, possible sanctions include —

Course Summary

This Course explains the basic requirements that a company must follow when carrying out government contracts. A basic understanding of the law is essential to (1) ensuring that the company meets its contractual obligations; (2) protecting the company's reputation; and (3) reducing the company's exposure to negative publicity and costly liability for violations of the law.

The topics covered in the Course include —

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Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

INFO-Foreight Corrupt 

With the increasing globalization of our economy, companies are faced with new challenges as well as new opportunities. Part of this new environment is compliance with laws such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA, which regulate the way U.S. companies transact international business. Enacted in 1977, the FCPA was a response to government findings that hundreds of U.S. companies, including many of the Fortune 500, were using cash and "slush funds" to make questionable or illegal payments to foreign government officials, politicians and political parties. The purpose of the statute is to halt the bribery of foreign officials and restore public confidence in the integrity of the American business system.

Recent international initiatives, including the Inter-American Convention Against Corruption and the OECD's Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions, have refocused the world's attention on anti-bribery issues. Major U.S. trading partners have now promised that they, too, will enact legislation similar to the FCPA. In fact, at least 21 signatories of the OECD convention have already done so. These international efforts to battle corruption mean that U.S. companies can compete on the merits with increasing certainty that they will not be undercut by a competitor's illicit payment to a foreign-government purchaser. They also mean that there is an increased emphasis on enforcement of anti-corruption legislation worldwide, and particularly of the FCPA within the U.S., making company compliance more important than ever.

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Fraud Awareness and Detection

INFO-FraudCorporate fraud is on the rise. Losses attributable to corporate fraud were estimated at $600 billion in 2002, up from $400 billion in 1996. Employee theft alone costs American businesses between $60 and $120 billion a year. Aside from unscrupulous employees and third parties, a major contributing factor to corporate fraud is simply a lack of awareness of it.

Dishonest employees prey on unsuspecting co-workers and supervisors, and clever third parties use so-called “social engineering” tactics to penetrate a company’s defenses. Because successful fraud schemes are hard to detect, everyone from rank-and-file employees to executives needs at least a basic knowledge of how these schemes work and what the warning signs are.

Course Summary

This Course is intended not only to instill in employees a sense of responsibility to comply with the law and report misconduct, but also to make employees aware of fraud so that it can be detected and nipped in the bud. The Course covers the most common types of fraud used to siphon millions of dollars from corporations every day. The topics covered include:

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Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act Privacy Policy

INFO-GLB 

Advances in "information technology" have enabled companies to collect, compile, analyze and deliver data around the world much more quickly and cheaply than ever before. These advances have given consumers better access to information, and they've given companies lower-cost and better-targeted opportunities to market and provide their goods and services.

But these technological advances have also brought new challenges to protecting information privacy. In response, Congress recently passed the "Financial Services Modernization Act" (also known as the "Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act" or "GLBA" after its Senate sponsors), which imposes significant information-privacy requirements on a broad array of "financial institutions." The Act applies not only to banks, securities firms and insurance companies, but also to other providers of financial products and services such as retailers issuing credit cards, money transmitters, check cashers, mortgage brokers, real-estate settlement services, appraisers, tax-preparation services, and even online companies that offer aggregation, funds-transfer or payment services.

Numerous federal agencies have passed regulations implementing the GLBA in somewhat different ways in different industries. This training Course focuses on the privacy and security regulations passed by the Office of Thrift Supervision, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Because the Course content is fully customizable, however, the Course is readily adaptable to cover the similar regulations passed by the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, the National Credit Union Administration, and the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, as well as individual states.

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Healthcare Fraud and Abuse

INFO-Healthcare FraudAccording to the Government Accounting Office, healthcare fraud and abuse account for three to ten percent of all healthcare costs — well over $100 billion annually. Whatever the cost, fraud and abuse waste badly needed resources and seriously undermine our healthcare system.

The healthcare industry is subject to many different laws that concern fraud — including the False Claims Act, the Stark Law, the Anti-Kickback Statute, HIPAA and the Prescription Drug Marketing Act. On top of this legislative infrastructure, government agencies and trade organizations have created a patchwork of guidelines and codes. Together, these laws, guidelines and codes present a significant compliance challenge.

Course Summary

This Course is intended to help healthcare professionals and employees navigate the regulatory maze and raise awareness about fraud and abuse so that misconduct can be detected and prevented. The topics covered include —

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HIPAA Privacy Primer

INFO-HIPAA 

Rapid advances in "information technology" have led to growing concern for the privacy and security of personal information. This is especially true in the area of healthcare, where individuals share details of their health, personal lives and finances when they are at their most vulnerable. New regulations under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act ("HIPAA") address these issues by imposing stringent record-keeping and security requirements on healthcare providers and related entities.

The new regulations require uniform coding for the electronic transmission of patient data. In addition, the regulations require "covered entities" — healthcare providers, health insurance plans, healthcare clearinghouses, and those who contract with these entities — to create and implement privacy policies covering all patient data that is electronically transmitted or maintained (along with all paper counterparts). The work needed to comply with these regulations presents a tremendous challenge for healthcare organizations.

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Immigration Law Primer

 INFO-Immigration

The U.S. immigration laws are increasingly important as companies compete in the global marketplace. In a nutshell, it is against the law for a foreign national to enter the U.S. to work unless that individual has obtained a valid visa. Likewise, it is against the law for an employer (1) to hire a person who has not actually received an appropriate visa, or (2) to hire or continue to employ a person whose authorized stay to work has expired. Compliance with these basic rules can be tricky and requires strict adherence to certain record-keeping practices, as explained in the Course.

Course Summary

The topics covered in the Course include —

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Information Security

INFO-Information Security 

Along with music and movies, information is increasingly digital, making it easy to transmit and copy -- and easy to misuse. While the entertainment industry scrambles to find ways to protect its copyrights, corporations are likewise struggling to protect their confidential information and to keep pace with the increasingly stringent laws that protect consumer and employee privacy.

Although teenage hackers from Singapore to Helsinki make the headlines, ordinary breaches of information security often start with things such as an intruder in the workspace, an unscrupulous co-worker or a laptop swiped at an airport. A password scrawled on a post-it note under an employee’s desk or an un-shredded, discarded memo may be the keys to security breaches that cause grave damage to a company’s financial status and reputation.

Laws such as HIPAA and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act demand that employees take specific precautions with certain types of personal information they handle. But even companies that are not subject to these laws must be sure their employees understand and follow company policies for protecting data in all forms. 

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Managing within the Law

INFO-Managing The LawEffective management is vital to a successful company. Too often, individuals who have excelled in a company due to a specific skills set are promoted to managerial positions before having adequate management training or any at all. 

As a consequence, many managers lack the interpersonal skills, sensitivity, legal awareness and professionalism necessary for effective management. The result can be disastrous: endless conflicts; low morale and productivity; wasted talent; high and costly turnover; and lawsuits based on privacy violations, discrimination, harassment, wrongful termination, among other things.

As the workforce and legal mandates have grown more complex, the need for both managerial skills and awareness of the legal ramifications of management decisions has increased dramatically. Employers cannot afford to allow managers to learn through trial and error; comprehensive management training is necessary to prepare managers for today’s workforce.

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INFO-Laundering MoneyMoney Laundering

Have you ever seen a drug dealer pull out a credit-card machine to accept payment for a dime bag? Ever known someone to pay for a TV they bought off the back of a truck with a personal check? Probably not. Most criminals conduct their business in cash. This creates an obvious problem - cash is bulky, heavy and risky to carry around. (One million dollars in twenties weighs about one hundred pounds.) As a result, criminals need to find a way to "launder" their ill-gotten gains. "Money laundering" is the process that criminals use to disguise the true origin and ownership of cash by introducing it into legitimate enterprises. Laundering money is a lucrative and sophisticated business, both in the U.S. and overseas. Some sources estimate that more than $300 billion is laundered annually worldwide.

You might say, "We're not a bank, so why do we need to be worried?" There are several reasons why it is important to have some familiarity with the money-laundering process, the laws that make it illegal, and our legal responsibilities to help prevent it. As banks and financial institutions become more closely scrutinized by law enforcement in connection with money-laundering activity, criminals are forced to become more creative in finding ways to introduce their ill-gotten gains into the legitimate economy. Increasingly, they are using other types of businesses in the laundering process. Therefore, a company is more vulnerable than ever.

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Preventing Discrimination and Harassment

INFO-Preventing DiscriminationDating back to the late 1800s, common law in the United States defined the employment relationship as "at will," meaning that employers were free to hire and fire at will. Employers could, for example, refuse to hire minorities, segregate the work force, assign unpleasant work to women, and deny such groups opportunities for advancement.

That's all changed. Federal and state laws prohibit discrimination and harassment in the workplace on the basis of age, sex, race, religion, national origin or disability. Not only can workplace discrimination and harassment affect employee productivity, it can divert resources from the company's real business. Improper conduct can also lead to company liability for workplace discrimination and harassment.

Training employees to prevent workplace discrimination and harassment is nothing less than essential. The U.S. Supreme Court has recently established legal standards that employers must meet to avoid — or at least minimize — incidents of discrimination and harassment and avoid liability for punitive damages.

The first steps in meeting these standards are (1) to create an anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policy, and (2) to communicate it to all employees and independent contractors, both full-time and part-time, permanent and temporary. This Course includes a generic policy, which you can use or readily substitute with your company's policy. The Course also includes a quiz/game to test employees' understanding of the material.

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Questionable Interview Questions

INFO-Questionable InterviewMany aspects of employment are heavily regulated in the U.S., none more than the interviewing and hiring process. State and federal statutes and court decisions prohibit employers from discriminating against certain groups of people and from taking actions that impact those groups adversely and unfairly.

Employees involved in the recruiting, interviewing and hiring process need to be aware of the laws that govern the questions they ask applicants. This Course will help them (1) avoid the questions that could get them or your company into legal trouble, and (2) phrase their questions within legal limits to elicit the information the company needs.

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Record ManagementINFO-Record Management

A company's corporate records are one of its most important and valuable assets. Almost every employee is responsible for creating or maintaining corporate records of some kind, whether in the form of paper, computer data, microfilm, electronic mail or voice-mail. Letters, memoranda and contracts are obviously corporate records, as are things such as a desk calendar, an appointment book or an expense record.

Companies are required by law to maintain certain types of corporate records, usually for a specified period of time. The failure to retain such documents for these minimum periods can subject a company to penalties, fines or other sanctions or could put it at a serious disadvantage in litigation. Accordingly, every company should establish a Record Retention Policy to provide guidelines for maintaining complete and accurate corporate records — that is, to help employees understand what records to keep and for how long, what records to dispose of, and how to dispose of them.

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Reductions in Force

INFO-Reduction in Force

Layoffs in corporate America have become the stuff of daily headlines. Since last December, U.S. companies have announced more than 500,000 job cuts, and that trend is continuing. Among the challenges that companies face in this regard are (1) organizing, training and empowering a smaller workforce to deliver improved services; (2) preserving the dignity of departing employees; and (3) boosting the morale and productivity of the employees who remain.

The purpose of this training Course is to help managers minimize the negative impact of this experience for those whom they are charged with informing of the company's reduction-in-force decision. It is grounded in the notion that a fairly and humanely administered reduction in force will promote trust and faith in the management and future of the company.

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Regulation FD Training

INFO-Regulations FD

Regulation FD, for "fair disclosure" dictates how public companies may disclose certain types of information about themselves. In essence, Regulation FD requires that a public company's communications regarding so-called inside information be made in an approved form of public disclosure. The purpose of the regulation is to make all material information about a company available to all investors at the same time.

Course Summary

This Course explains how Regulation FD affects the way companies and their subsidiaries communicate certain information to outside parties. The topics covered in the Course include —

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Sanctions and Trade Embargoes

INFO-Sanctions

 

The US Government, through the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), uses economic sanctions and trade embargoes to protect the country's economy and enhance its security. Every US company must comply with all applicable sanction and embargo regulations or the company — and in some cases the individual employees involved — will face substantial criminal and civil penalties.

Course Summary

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Sarbanes-Oxley Act Primer

INFO-SOXThe corporate-responsibility scandals and business failures involving companies such as Enron, Adelphia and Global Crossing revealed widespread accounting, self-dealing and mismanagement issues. Seeking to instill greater accountability by senior management of public companies, Congress enacted the Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002. The prevailing view among legal commentators is that the Act is by far the most significant federal securities law passed since 1934.

Sarbanes-Oxley addresses a wide range of topics, including corporate-governance practices, ethics, executive compensation and financial disclosures. Its principal impacts are to (1) impose new obligations on corporate officers and directors, and (2) increase the scope and severity of the penalties that may be imposed on public companies and their officers and auditors for violations of federal securities laws.

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The SBAR Technique

INFO-SBAR

Every year in the US, communication gaps between nurses and doctors cause medical errors that lead to needless deaths of thousands of patients. Although healthcare professionals are routinely trained on how to communicate with patients, training on how to communicate with each other had remained rare until the introduction of the SBAR Technique.

The SBAR Technique provides a framework for healthcare professionals to communicate with one another in emergency situations. Developed by the US Navy for use on nuclear submarines, the SBAR Technique is fast becoming part of hospital protocol in emergency rooms across the nation.

This Course examines how communication breaks down between healthcare professionals, especially doctors and nurses. It contains checklists and hypothetical scenarios that demonstrate how SBAR is done and addresses other ways in which communication in an emergency healthcare environment can be mastered.

Course Summary

This Course illustrates the SBAR Technique in detail. The topics covered in the Course include —

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Trade Secrets

Protecting trade secrets is more important than ever today, as companies look for ways to get ahead and stay ahead of the competition. Prudent companies are recognizing the need not only to protect their own confidential business information as trade secrets, but also to guard against the misappropriation of others' trade secrets.

In most cases, it is an act or omission of a company's employees that leads to a loss, theft or misappropriation of trade secrets. More and more companies are taking steps to prevent the loss or misappropriation of their confidential business information. One of the best ways to do this is through employee education — communicating the risks and setting out procedures to address them. A critical step in this process is assembling a policy on trade secrets and communicating it to all employees — both temporary and permanent, as well as independent contractors — who may use, create or have access to the company's trade secrets.

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Unfair Competition

INFO-Unfair Competition 

 

The rules regarding what is fair and unfair competition affect virtually all of a company's business decisions — hiring, marketing, sales, customer-relations, and research and development, among others — and are important for employees to understand. Violations of these rules can be very damaging to a company generally and, in some cases, to individual employees.

 

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Whistleblowing

INFO-Whistleblowing 

The federal government spends half a trillion dollars annually on medical care - one-quarter of its budget, and fraudulent claims may total $50 billion this year. One major source of fraud is the submission of false claims for government funds, such as Medicare and Medicaid.

In 1986, Congress enacted amendments to a Civil War Era law called the False Claims Act (FCA), which penalizes those responsible for submitting false claims for government funds. These amendments were designed to strengthen the incentives for individuals to sue organizations that are engaged in fraud. Reporting these abuses is commonly known as a form of "whistleblowing".

Employees can be one of the best defenses against fraud through whistleblowing. A whistleblower can be any employee or former employee who reports misconduct, up to and including filing a lawsuit related to the fraud.

Course Summary

This Course is intended to show employees when, how and why to use the whistleblowing provisions of the FCA. It covers not only the incentives for whistleblowing, but also how a whistleblower is protected under the law. The topics include:

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Workplace DiversityINFO-Workplace Diversity

Dramatic cultural and social changes in the mid-twentieth century altered Western society in a way that affected the workforce and the customer base companies serve. The emergence of a global economy and revolutionary advances in telecommunications later in the century made the world a much "smaller" place.

In the new millennium, the corporate world finds itself in an environment in which people of a wide variety of races, cultures, religions, ages and lifestyles interact regularly on the same level both within and outside the workplace. The norms that dictated behavior between men and women a half-century ago are transforming, as well.

Diversity is ever more apparent in everything from our names to the types of food we eat, and long-taboo subjects are now discussed freely. People in wheelchairs work alongside openly gay co-workers, and a variety of languages is spoken by employees and customers alike. Human conditions from obesity and dwarfism to mental illness and alcoholism are treated with increasing sensitivity and openness.

Our laws on the federal, state and local level have added a level of legal protection in the workplace that all employees need to be aware of. Diversity-awareness training covers these protections, and it goes on to (1) emphasize the importance of treating everyone with respect and dignity and (2) demonstrate how embracing diversity can be a sound business strategy.

The Course includes a quiz/game to test employees' understanding of the material.

Course Summary

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*Compliance & Ethics are Flash based courses

Lesson Descriptions:

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ID Theft Awareness & Prevention Training Course has been approved for Continuing Education Credits (CEUs) by:

* State of Oregon Insurance Division

* Mortgage Lending Education Board (MLEB)

* IDTAEC.org (ID Theft Awareness Education Certification) - Independent Sales Representatives Certification Association

Consumer Course Available!

Highly recommended for your banking institution customers!

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GIDT
IDTELi Awareness Prevention Protection  Employee Training

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